On Belle Isle, the towing and ticketing is about to begin

Ever since the renovation of Belle Isle Park in 2008 and the changes in on-street parking that came with it, daytime traffic on the south side of the island on Island Avenue has been a challenge. (maybe we ought to say, even a greater challenge).

Loading zones are few, and trucks often block the street beginning with food trucks in the morning rush hour and throughout the weekday.

Part of the problem is design; another is too few spaces. But cars and trucks that overstay the 30-minute parking zones and loading zones make it all worse.

Starting Monday, the city of Miami Beach plans to crack down on violators, at the request of Belle Isle residents. Here’s the note Belle Isle Residents Association president Scott Diffenderfer sent our this weekend:

Please note that new Freight Loading Zones and 30 minute parking zones are in effect on Belle Isle and the warning period is over.  Cars in violation will be ticketed and/or towed at owner’s expense.  Please make sure you and your guests pay attention to the signs and park legally.  These parking zones were created due to resident complaints of trucks illegally parking in the road.

5 responses to “On Belle Isle, the towing and ticketing is about to begin

  1. Richard A. Freeman, Esq.

    The problem of insufficient parking for cars, and trucks, in particular, is a problem of the City’s own making. When the City was re-designing the park and streets a decade or so ago, it eliminated the parking spaces for trucks by adding landscaping planters in front of all the condominiums on the south side of Island Avenue. At the time, we protested vehemently, telling the City that the addition of planting areas in place of truck parking was seemingly beneficial, but practically irrational, given the fact that Island Avenue had to accommodate moving trucks and service trucks on a daily basis in order to service the many residents living in the multi-story condominiums. For more than a decade, moving and service companies have had to cope with the dearth of parking on the south side of Island Avenue. Now, the City of Miami Beach is “cracking down” on the offenders? The real offenders are the members of the Planning Department that built a park and streets that are insufficient for the daily needs of residents of Belle Isle. Indeed, this is a problem that has infected most of Miami Beach. We have insufficient infrastructure to accommodate the multitudes of people who are moving into existing (and new!) multi-family dwellings that are being renovated, and constructed, on Miami Beach. Poor foresight. Poor judgment.

  2. Nellie Barrios

    I agree. We had numerous meetings and yet the response was that it would be addressed in the future if it was a problem but changing the “plan” would cause delays in the park renovation.

    So the future is here and the solution is to penalize-trucks get ticketed, residents get towed and the problem has been resolved.

    Not really, just tow truck companies and the city making money on the problem they created.

  3. Arielle Schrader

    I have been paying particular attention to this situation bc last Thursday at 9:03am my car was hooked to a Beach Tow truck in one of these new “commercial loading zone” spaces at 9:03am. Since I was there before it was hauled away I had to pay a $140 “drop fee” on top of a $28 citation by a police officer who had ZERO mercy for a few minute grace period. (After reading the Miami Beach Tow Bill of Rights I was wrongly charged the fee since my car had not been moved one inch, but that’s another story!).

    Anyways, now that towing (forget ticketing) is in full effect. I have found NO ONE now parks in these (15?) designated spaces for fear of being towed. Trucks are still in the street stalking people waiting for regular residential spaces to open up and leaving zone 14 residents less parking than ever during the weekdays. Most of these workers cannot do their job in 30 minutes so why would they park there and run the risk? As no one seems to enforce residential zoning during the week.

  4. Arielle Schrader

    have been paying particular attention to this situation bc last Thursday at 9:03am my car was hooked to a Beach Tow truck in one of these new “commercial loading zone” spaces at 9:03am. Since I was there before it was hauled away I had to pay a $140 “drop fee” on top of a $28 citation by a police officer who had ZERO mercy for a few minute grace period. (After reading the Miami Beach Tow Bill of Rights I was wrongly charged the fee since my car had not been moved one inch, but that’s another story!).

    Anyways, now that towing (forget ticketing) is in full effect. I have found NO ONE now parks in these (15?) designated spaces for fear of being towed. Trucks are still in the street stalking people waiting for regular residential spaces to open up and leaving zone 14 residents less parking than ever during the weekdays. Most of these workers cannot do their job in 30 minutes so why would they park there and run the risk? As no one seems to enforce residential zoning during the week.

    If the police officers are not getting a kick-back from the tow companies I would be shocked..

  5. Great article. I can honestly say that I’ve been in the towing industry for some time now and I wouldn’t want to be a part of this kind of “cracking down” if this were in my community. We have to make a living of course but my gosh ethics is important too Seems like this is a bit much. But I suppose life isn’t fair.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s